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  • Katie Ford

How can we talk responsibly about emotive topics online in veterinary medicine?


Dr. Rosie Allister
Dr. Rosie Allister

In today's digital age, social media has become an integral part of many of our lives. However, with its vast reach and influence, it is crucial to approach emotive topics responsibly when posting online. That's why VETstagram, in collaboration with Dr. Rosie Allister, is proud to make this webinar on talking about suicide responsibly on social media open access. We believe this session holds immense value and have made it free for all to access, so everyone that feels in the right headspace to watch can benefit from it. In this blog post, we will explore the significance of responsible online posting and provide you with the resources to watch this insightful session.


The Importance of Responsible Online Posting:


Emotive topics, such as suicide, require utmost sensitivity and care when discussing them online. Posting about these subjects without considering the potential impact can inadvertently cause harm to vulnerable individuals. It is our responsibility as content creators and social media users to be mindful of our words and actions. This webinar, conducted by Dr. Rosie Allister, offers valuable insights into how we can navigate these discussions responsibly.


Dr. Rosie Allister's Powerful 1-Hour Session:


Dr. Rosie Allister graciously agreed to provide this pre-recorded webinar for VETstagram, specifically addressing the topic of responsible online posting about suicide. The session begins with a heartfelt check-in by Dr. Allister, where she encourages viewers to assess their emotional readiness before watching the content. This ensures that individuals who engage with the webinar are in the right mindset to process the information without experiencing any unintended negative effects.


Accessing the Session:


We believe in the importance of making this session widely accessible, which is why we have made it open to all, completely free of charge. This video accompanies an article shared by the BVA (British Veterinary Association), you can find it here. This article serves as an additional resource for those interested in delving deeper into the topic of responsible online posting.





Spread the Word:


We encourage you to share this session with anyone who may find it valuable. By increasing awareness and understanding of responsible online posting, we can collectively create a safer digital environment. Help us spread the word and promote responsible discussions on social media.


Additional Support from Vetlife:


Dr. Rosie Allister also sheds light on the support services provided by Vetlife in the video. Vetlife is available to those involved in the UK veterinary community, offering assistance 24/7. If you or someone you know requires support, Vetlife can be reached via email or telephone at 0303 040 2551.


Conclusion:


As content creators and social media users, it is crucial that we approach emotive topics responsibly when posting online. VETstagram, in collaboration with Dr. Rosie Allister, has made this powerful session on responsible online posting about suicide open access to all. We encourage you to watch this insightful webinar and share it with others who may benefit from it. Together, let's foster a culture of responsible and compassionate discussions on social media.


About Dr. Rosie Allister BSc (Hons) BVSc MSc PhD MRCVS


Dr Rosie Allister has received the British Veterinary Association Chiron Award and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons Impact Award for work on veterinary mental health. Rosie manages Vetlife Helpline, a 24 hour support service for everyone in the UK veterinary community. Her research, based at the University of Edinburgh, looks at veterinary mental health, wellbeing at work, and veterinary suicide prevention. She has written and spoken extensively about veterinary mental health in the UK and internationally. She has volunteered with Samaritans for 19 years and advises a number of national organisations on suicide prevention and self harm.

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